Monday 29th August, 2016

Catholic Today
All Catholic Related History for this Day

Today in the year of Our Lord 2016 is the Memorial of the Passion of Saint John the Baptist and the Beheading of St. John the Baptist; St. Sabina, martyr




Memorial of the Passion of Saint John the Baptist

In addition to the feast of the nativity of St. John the Baptist (June 24), the Church, since the fourth century, commemorates the martyrdom of Christ’s precursor. According to theRoman Martyrology, this day marks “the second finding of his most venerable head.” The body of the saint was buried in Samaria. In the year 362 pagans desecrated the grave and burned his remains. Only a small portion of his relics were able to be saved by monks and sent to St. Athanasius at Alexandria. The head of the saint is venerated at various places. That in the Church of St. Sylvester in Rome belongs to a martyr-priest John. Also in the Dominican church at Breslau the Baptist’s head is honored.

Excerpted from The Church’s Year of Grace, Pius Parsch

There is no doubt that blessed John suffered imprisonment and chains as a witness to our Redeemer, whose forerunner he was, and gave his life for him. His persecutor had demanded not that he should deny Christ, but only that he should keep silent about the truth. Nevertheless, he died for Christ. Does Christ not say: “I am the truth”? Therefore, because John shed his blood for the truth, he surely died for Christ.

Through his birth, preaching and baptizing, he bore witness to the coming birth, preaching and baptism of Christ, and by his own suffering he showed that Christ also would suffer.

Such was the quality and strength of the man who accepted the end of this present life by shedding his blood after the long imprisonment. He preached the freedom of heavenly peace, yet was thrown into irons by ungodly men. He was locked away in the darkness of prison, though he came bearing witness to the Light of life and deserved to be called a bright and shining lamp by that Light itself, which is Christ.

To endure temporal agonies for the sake of the truth was not a heavy burden for such men as John; rather it was easily borne and even desirable, for he knew eternal joy would be his reward.

Since death was ever near at hand, such men considered it a blessing to embrace it and thus gain the reward of eternal life by acknowledging Christ’s name. Hence the apostle Paul rightly says: “You have been granted the privilege not only to believe in Christ but also to suffer for his sake.” He tells us why it is Christ’s gift that his chosen ones should suffer for him: “The sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that is to be revealed in us.”

— Saint Bede the Venerable


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St. Sabina, martyr

According to legend, Sabina was born in Vindena, Umbria, and became the wife of a notable person having the name Valentine. She was converted to the faith by her maid Serapia, a Christian virgin. When Serapia died a martyr’s death (her feast occurs on September 3 in the Roman Martyrology), Sabina gave her servant’s holy body an honorable burial. On that account she was cast into prison by Emperor Hadrian and brought before the judge Elpidius. “Are you Sabina, illustrious by family and marriage?” he asked. “Yes, I am,” came the reply, “but I thank my Savior Jesus Christ that through His servant Serapia He has freed me from the power of hell.” Due to her contempt of the gods, she was condemned to death. Christians buried her body in the same grave as her teacher in the faith.

Excerpted from The Church’s Year of Grace, Pius Parsch


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In an effort to include all Catholics, those who go to the EF & OF of the Latin Rite, you may notice some Saints not mentioned in your Missal or Liturgical Calendar – this is because we are including all Saints from both Calendars. Because of this some Feast days will be repeated throughout the year



Today in Catholic History

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Today in 1261 – Pope Urban IV succeeds Pope Alexander IV as the 182nd pope.

He was not a Cardinal; only a few popes since his time have not been Cardinals, including Gregory X, Urban V and Urban VI.

 

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Today in 1484 Pope Innocent VIII succeeds Pope Sixtus IV.

He created and sold curial offices to end a fiscal crisis begun under Sixtus IV, whom he succeeded. Innocent married his illegitimate children into the princely families, and he was responsible for an increase in the persecution of “witches” in Germany. He agreed in 1489 to hold Sultan Bayezid II’s brother prisoner in Rome in exchange for a yearly ransom and the lance of Longinus. Innocent recognized Henry Tudor as Henry VII of England and banned discussion of the works of Pico della Mirandola. In 1492, when the Spanish drove the Moors from Grenada, Innocent proclaimed a jubilee.

 

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Today in 1526Pál Tomori Hungarian archbishop and soldier receives his eternal reward (b. 1475)

Many legends and stories exist about him. These include that his wife was killed, causing him to become a monk, and that he only became archbishop due to the pressure of his king, but refused to wear anything but his armour and the monk’s cowl.

 

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Today in 1799 Pope Pius VI receives his eternal reward (b. 1717)

Pius VI condemned the French Revolution and the suppression of the Gallican Church; he was later expelled from thePapal States by French troops from 1798 until his death one year later in Valence. His reign is the fourth-longest in papal history, being over two decades.

Is there a noteworthy historical date that isn’t mentioned, leave a comment and let us know

Catholic Today
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